Radio Tunis



Few people would disagree that Radio Tunis is by far and away the most well-known radio station in Tunisia. Having been launched all the way back in 1938 this will come as no surprise, with this being long before any private stations were even allowed to come to the airwaves.

Publically owned, Radio Tunis is another station out there that broadcasts both in the Arabic and French languages. As the name also suggests, the station is based in Tunis although is broadcast to the majority of the country.

 

What is the history behind Radio Tunis?

Following the agreement that effectively created state radio in 1938, Radio Tunis-PTT (as it was initially known) was amongst one of the first to breach the airwaves. It was established by Phillipe Soupault and while he was eventually removed from the position after being found guilty and imprisoned for high treason, he had a significant input in the direction which the station initially headed in.

When we speak about this direction, we can look at some of the main ways in which Radio Tunis broadcast content in its early days. At first, it was predominantly used religiously – particularly during Ramadan. For example, it would be used to break the fast, and make a call to prayer. As well as this, verses from the Koran would regularly be read out at set periods during the day.

It would be fair to say that the station underwent several of its biggest transformations just a year after its launched. It was firstly renamed Radio Tunis, as we all know it as today, while a second studio was installed which meant that content could be broadcast in both French and Arabic to satisfy the masses.

 

What content does Radio Tunis broadcast?

In comparison with the private stations that don the Tunisian airways, there’s no doubt that Radio Tunis reaches a different audience. This audience is certainly varied and the fact that it is operated by the state means that the content is a little more restrictive than the private option again.

Nevertheless, anyone who enjoys Tunisian music will generally tune into Radio Tunis. Unsurprisingly, the station places particular emphasis on local singers and musicians and this is how many are able to start their careers in the country.

Additionally, the station has always broadcast sports bulletins, news from the rest of Europe and even radio soap operas.